billboard - default
interstitial1 - interstitial
interstitial2 - interstitial

How to Refurbish a Lowboy in One Day

SHARE

Equipment Maintenance and Repair

Hughes Enterprises' refurbished lowboy trailer
Hughes Enterprises' refurbished lowboy trailer.

Hughes Enterprises of Big Piney, Wyoming, specializes in everything from heavy hauling and construction to the environmental cleanup of contaminated soils for customers based throughout Wyoming and the surrounding states.

It hauls equipment and vehicles weighing up to 100,000 pounds across state lines and to job sites hundreds of miles from its headquarters.

“We have a full inventory of heavy machinery ranging from backhoes to crushing equipment,” said co-owner Keith Hughes. “Sometimes getting there is half of the job. Unfortunately, our business does not take lightly to delays. So, everything has to be ready to roll whenever the work comes in, and no matter the location,” said Hughes. 

Repeated heavy loading and unloading and long trips take a toll on the company’s trailers. One 55-ton lowboy constantly tackles most of the heavy-duty work.

“Travel and wear really took a toll on the unit, which was used on nearly every job for the past 15 years,” said Greg Meismer of Hughes. “Earlier this year, we gave the lowboy and its trailer a total facelift.”

Based on the referral of an industry colleague and some online research, Hughes Enterprises turned to TrailerDecking.com for the materials needed to refurbish the lowboy’s 42-foot-long and 8.5-foot-wide platform.

This included the purchase of a complete collection of 3-inch screws, T40 Torx Heads, 82-degree countersink, and 9/32-inch drill bits, as well as 200 square feet of the company’s Genuine Apitong/Keruing 2x8 full sawn rough heavy-duty deck boards, and Apitong Oil.

Developed with a proprietary blend of Tung Oil, UV blockers, fungicide, and trans-oxide pigments, Apitong Oil’s water-resistant, acid-resistant formula is designed to extend the usable service life of wood products as it maintains the wood's natural color and delays graying and weathering.

According to Meismer, the day-long restoration project started with three Hughes employees removing the lowboy’s damaged deck boards and cutting the Genuine Apitong/Keruing into 22 pieces that ranged from 11 to 13 feet in length. The boards were then stained with the Apitong Oil and screwed down onto the low boy using the installation tools supplied by TrailerDecking.com.

“The end result was amazing,” said Meismer. “Absolutely beautiful. Most people can’t even believe it’s the same trailer.”

“Well worth the time and effort,” added Hughes. “Our credibility is based upon our ability to deliver results on time. This trailer is an essential part of our business–one that will hopefully withstand the rigorous demands of our industry for the next 8 to 10 years or beyond.”

Source: TrailerDecking.com